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    Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill

    This is a discussion on Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill within the General Computing and Internet forums, part of the Community channel category; All traffic thru dedicated stealth VPN connected to thru proxy and block #53 completely. Encrypt all devices with open source ...

    1. #11
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      Re: Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill

      All traffic thru dedicated stealth VPN connected to thru proxy and block #53 completely. Encrypt all devices with open source deniable encryption and you will be pretty much as secure as you can be. I did this and still just look at Farcebook. OFC the ultimate hackerproof way is turn it all off!

      Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk


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    3. #12
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      Re: Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill

      I think the problem here is that HMG have not thought it through properly.
      Far from enabling the detection of criminal activities, the collection of mass data is actually going to hinder.

      First, they won't be able to collect and store it all anyway.

      If they could, interrogating it for potential criminal activity is beyond their computing power.

      Any criminal activity will be hidden even more by the masses of unrelated data than it is now.


      Tor is becoming so overused it is defeating its own object.

    4. #13
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      Re: Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill

      The initial idea was to collect the information about which sites a person visits & whom they communicate with.

      The intention is to retain the data for a year, then to destroy it.

      This means that if you get caught doing something pretty bad, the investigatory services can see who else you've been communicating with and check out everyone else from there.

      Ok many criminals tend to be lacking in brain power, hence they keep getting caught. However it doesn't take much to realise that if you are planning something big you simply stop communicating with others for more than one year.

      In the mean time the Government has collected data relating to the other 60 million people that live in the UK and any and all visitors to these shores, along with data relating to many others who don't live in the UK, but have innocently communicated with those of us who live here.

      All that data has to be stored somewhere. That somewhere requires hardware, physical storage space (i.e. room within a data centre), electricity and maintenance. Someone (a human) will require access. That means it will be vulnerable to hackers.

      There are many less-than-savoury individuals out there who might want to know things about people that they are otherwise not entitled to know. PIs would love to short-cut a few hoops to see if someone is having an affair. Perhaps another wants to blackmail someone for visiting a XXX website. This and much more already happens without having some single mass storage for the Government.

      Let's not make it easier for them.

      PlusNet Fibre since Jan 2021
      Previously Sky Fibre & Sky BB since 2010.

    5. #14
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      Re: Problems Remain Government Publishes Revised ISP Internet Spying Bill

      I see that the second draft of the state spying bill is up for a second reading today:

      Opposition Grows as UK Internet Spying Bill Hits Parliament - ISPreview UK

      Most people can easily understand and support the desire to snoop on suspected criminals and terrorists, but is it really necessary to invade the privacy of every single person in the UK in order achieve that? Do we make ourselves safer by making ourselves less free or is this merely storing up trouble for the future (history shows that such wonderful things as democracy can easily be lost through ignorance and fear). The answer will depend upon the final form of this bill.
      ++ speedyrite ... powered by NOW Broadband from June 2018 ++
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