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    Are you afraid of CRUMPETS?

    This is a discussion on Are you afraid of CRUMPETS? within the Everyday Life forums, part of the Community channel category; Are you afraid of CRUMPETS? Experts say most people fear clusters of holes because our ancestors were taught to avoid ...

    1. #1
      Scubbie's Avatar
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      Are you afraid of CRUMPETS?

      Are you afraid of CRUMPETS? Experts say most people fear clusters of holes because our ancestors were taught to avoid them | Mail Online
      [QUOTE]
      • British scientists said Everyday objects with many closely-packed holes can be a trigger for people who report suffering from trypophobia
      • A University of Essex study suggests the predominantly latent phobia is associated with ancient threats such as beehives and venous creatures
      • The researchers believe there may be an ancient evolutionary part of the human brain telling people that they are looking at a dangerous animal


      Crumpets and bubbly chocolate bars might fill some people with joy, but scientists claim that most humans have a primordial fear of clusters of holes.

      Everyday objects with many closely-packed holes can be a trigger for people who report suffering from trypophobia, or the fear of holes, which can lead to intensely unpleasant visceral reactions, psychologists claim.

      A study suggests the widespread, predominantly latent phobia is associated with ancient threats such as beehives, poisonous flowers and venomous creatures.

      ‘Tryophobia is the most common phobia you’ve never heard of,’ said Geoff Cole, a psychologist at the University of Essex, who is a self-diagnosed trypophobic. In a bid to unravel his own problem, Dr Cole recently led an investigation into the fear’s evolutionary underpinnings

      Together with his colleague Arnold Wilkins, he believes trypophobia may occur as a result of a specific visual feature also found among various poisonous animals.

      The findings, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggest 'there may be an ancient evolutionary part of the brain telling people that they are looking at a poisonous animal'.

      Trypophobia is widely documented by sufferers on the Internet and, in one study, Cole and Wilkins found that about 16 per cent of participants reported trypophobic reactions.

      Despite this, there has been little scientific investigation of the phenomenon.

      Dr Cole and Dr Wilkins, both vision scientists, wondered whether there might be a specific visual feature common to trypophobic objects.

      They compared 76 images of trypophobic objects along with 76 images of holes not associated with the phobia.

      After standardising various features of the images, the researchers found that the trypophobic objects had relatively high contrast energy at midrange spatial frequencies in comparison to the control images, which is to say they have a unique visual quality to them.

      One trypophobia sufferer told Dr Cole that an animal - a blue-ringed octopus, which is one of the most poisonous animals in the world - had caused him to experience a trypophobic reaction, which informed the direction of the study.

      The researchers analysed images of numerous poisonous animals, including the octopus, deathstalker scorpion and king cobra snake to discover that they tend to have 'high contrast at midrange spacial frequencies - the distribution of circles that triggers the trypophobic reaction.

      Based on their observations, the researchers believe the phobia could have an evolutionary basis and humans have learned to fear dangerous animals with these special markings - and even perhaps honeycomb which can lead to painful bee stings - to survive.

      Dr Cole said: 'We think that everyone has trypophobic tendencies even though they may not be aware of it.

      'We found that people who don't have the phobia still rate trypophobic images as less comfortable to look at than other images.'

      The pair are now investigating whether manipulating the spectral characteristics of images of everyday objects, like watches, leads people to prefer one object over another.

      They believe these experiments will shed light on just how ingrained trypophobic tendencies might be.


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    3. #2
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      Re: Are you afraid of CRUMPETS?

      I had crumpets for tea 10 mins ago
      Annie 🦋..........
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    4. #3
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      Re: Are you afraid of CRUMPETS?

      Aha, yes but do you also enjoy horror films, rollercoasters etc?

      I don't & i don't like muffins either. #beta-male

     

     

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