Your forum username:
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up


    Welcome to Sky User - The Unofficial Support Forum for everything Sky! - Proudly helping over 65k members.


    Advertisement

    Results 1 to 5 of 5
    Like Tree1Likes
    • 1 Post By steelysteph

    So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

    This is a discussion on So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you within the Entertainment forums, part of the Community channel category; So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you - BBC News If there’s one thing history has taught us: technology ...

    1. #1
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Other ISP
      Router: Non-Sky Router
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      28,234
      Thanks
      848
      Thanked 2,233 Times in 2,099 Posts

      So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

      So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you - BBC News
      If there’s one thing history has taught us: technology fails if using it makes you look like a plonker.

      I don’t mean a bit silly, like skiing on a Nintendo Wii, or a little crackers, like running around in Snapchat’s Spectacles. I mean the sort of technology that when you look across a room and see someone wearing it you don’t think “wow” or “that’s futuristic”.

      You just think… plonker.

      That’s how I felt when Rory started wearing Google Glass (sorry, Rory) and that’s how I've always felt about 3DTV.

      That was the first nail in its coffin. The second was the fact it really didn’t bring much to the TV-watching experience. The third? It was too expensive, even at a discount. And the fourth? It was uncomfortable, and according to some surveys, straining many people’s eyes and giving them headaches.

      This week we learned that both LG and Sony have now stopped making 3D-enabled televisions. The firms follow Samsung - the world’s biggest TV maker - who confirmed the move last year. It means there are currently no major manufacturers making 3DTVs.

      At this year’s CES trade show, there was barely a whimper of 3D TV, compared to just two years ago when it was being heralded as the next big thing.

      Money money money


      But you could argue that 3DTV was never about the home experience. Where it would come into its own was in huge cinemas with full surround and the kind of environment that would do the new(ish) medium justice. But here, too, things have ground to a miserable halt.

      Despite the moderately promising start made by Avatar, no single 3D production ever became a must-see.

      The 3D high point for me was the remake of the Jungle Book, but the enjoyment there was clearly the return to the songs that soundtracked my early childhood - not the fact the odd branch stuck out of the screen, even if it did enhance the immersion of the jungle which had been so beautifully animated.

      In the cinema, 3D was milked for all it was worth. Watching the 3D version of the film would often be a more expensive ticket. And while some theatres would give you free glasses you could return at the end, many would make you pay for them on the basis that you could “bring them back next time”. Imagine being the sort of person who brings their own pair of 3D glasses to a date. It's up there with owning your own pair of bowling shoes.

      Then, having to watch an hour’s worth of hollow Hollywood tat with plastic strapped to your face would soon see off any chance of an eventful evening.

      Even James Cameron, who directed Avatar, is fed up of 3D. It has "become a studio-driven top down process to make money”, he said (as if Hollywood has ever been anything else). The cinema-going public was immediately sceptical - knowing that the more the movie industry told them it was the next big thing, the more it felt like a pathetic gimmick. To quote The Oatmeal, “saying that 3D movies are the future of cinema is like saying that Magic Eye books were the future of literature”.

      'Blew it'


      Which is why most major studios have just about stopped bothering. The former head of Dreamworks Animation said that the industry “blew it” with 3D, something he blamed it as much on poor story-telling as limitations of the tech. And while there are plenty of 3D films lined up for this coming year, many of them have been bodged together using post-production, rather than filmed with 3D viewing in mind.

      There is still an audience for the technology in China, but it’s with no great sadness we accept that 3D is rather quickly on its way to being technology of a bygone era. A format that lost a format war without even having an opponent.

      It may well resurge. There has been good progress in making glasses-less 3D which, to my mind, is the biggest barrier here. But such innovations would just have to an added feature rather than the be-all-and-end-all - the window for selling 3D to the public has been slammed shut.

      So what’s next?

      According to CNet's report, TV makers are instead focusing on newer technologies such as HDR. And at CES 2017, one crowd-pleaser was LG's super-thin and light TV - the kind of innovation, I thought, that appealed to more people than something like 3D.

      Movie studios are pouring resources into virtual reality story-telling. I took part in a demo a year or so ago by the Oculus VR team at Facebook - it was a short animated film about a lovely little hedgehog who invites you into his home and… you’re six years old again. I cheered. I awww-ed. It’s remarkable - and it won an Emmy. Virtual reality is heralding new levels of realism and immersion to gaming, and films could, and hopefully will, follow suit.

      Which is great - because wearing a virtual reality headset doesn’t make you look silly at all.


    2. Advertisement
    3. #2
      dog-man's Avatar
      dog-man is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: About 130 mtrs from the cabinet.
      Broadband ISP: Virgin. Over 500mb.
      Router: Asus 3200
      Sky TV: Freesat
      Join Date
      Aug 2007
      Location
      Planet Earth
      Posts
      1,664
      Thanks
      93
      Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts

      Re: So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

      I always thought it was good depending on what I was viewing. I didn't mind wearing the glasses and I didn't get the headaches or eye aches that some claimed to get. I would have preferred 3D without glasses, but it was ok.

    4. #3
      seawright's Avatar
      seawright is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Other ISP
      Router: Non Sky Router
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Jul 2012
      Posts
      3,518
      Thanks
      65
      Thanked 389 Times in 379 Posts

      Re: So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

      Stereoscopic photography has been around for at least a century and is still important in areas of intelligence gathering and cartography and has made appearances in the consumer market since the 1940s, remember View-Master. Evidently the entertainment market thought that the time was right for 3D TV and manufacturers were sucked in by the hype. Unfortunately the technology didn't impress consumers enough to be economically viable.

      I'm sure 3D TV will return, just as fashion recurs, but not in the foreseeable future. As for VR it has a future in simulation and immersive gaming but as for mass-market entertainment? That will have to wait for Star Trek's Holodeck to become a reality.

    5. #4
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Other ISP
      Router: Non-Sky Router
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      28,234
      Thanks
      848
      Thanked 2,233 Times in 2,099 Posts

      Re: So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

      Personally I am a little disappointed but not that surprised.

      Sure a lot of 3D TVs were sold, but there hasn't been a large number made available in 4K. Very soon everyone produced either a HD 3D TV or a 4K TV. There are currently very few do both. I personally think they messed up here. Many consumers had just updated their TVs to a HD TV, some waited for 3D and most ended up waiting for improvements to 4K, such as HDR, and more content as a result.

      As for 3D itself, I still enjoy watching things in 3D. Admittedly it's a little difficult to both watch 3D content and contribute to the forums, so I only do one or the other.

      Blu-ray discs are still being made available in 3D and Sky still makes 3D content available, albeit on download only.

      I also do enjoy it at the cinema when the film is in 3D too. Admittedly the numbers thee appear to have dropped off considerably too. This highlights an issue that whilst Cinema 3D releases are in 4K, currently it appears that 4K Blu-rays aren't available with combined 3D content.

      Anyone remember the really big news when S-VHS was first made available? Did you buy a TV that supported S-VHS and a VCR and DVD player which also allowed you to see a better picture?

      PlusNet Fibre since Jan 2021
      Previously Sky Fibre & Sky BB since 2010.

    6. #5
      steelysteph's Avatar
      steelysteph is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Lancaster
      Broadband ISP: Other ISP
      Router: VM Hub 3
      Sky TV: 2TB Minnie Mous
      Join Date
      Oct 2009
      Posts
      400
      Thanks
      27
      Thanked 24 Times in 21 Posts

      Re: So long, 3DTV - we won't miss you

      It will be disappointing if they stop releasing 3d discs. Although I don't watch much 3d on my TV I do have a 3d projector and a 3m wide screen which is flipping brilliant for film nights.
      Scubbie likes this.

     

     

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    SkyUser - Copyright © 2006-2020. SatDish and NewsreadeR | SkyUser is in no way affiliated with Sky Broadband / BSkyB
    RIPA NOTICE: NO CONSENT IS GIVEN FOR INTERCEPTION OF PAGE TRANSMISSION