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    New Wireless Boosters from Sky

    This is a discussion on New Wireless Boosters from Sky within the Sky news and announcements forums, part of the SkyUser Announcements category; Backing up the router settings is always advisable pre=changes and post-changes. I always name the config files differently to reflect ...

    1. #21
      Scubbie's Avatar
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Backing up the router settings is always advisable pre=changes and post-changes. I always name the config files differently to reflect this.

      Hopefully the guide we put together for this site has helped a large number of people.

      Port forwarding - Setting up Port forwarding (use existing & set up custom services)

      It also helps to resrve IP Addresses, unless they have been manually set:

      IP Address Reservation

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    3. #22
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      New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      The steps do include reserving the IP address of the device the ports are being opened for.

      The instructions you have created will have been and still will be a massive help for people because I know for a fact that even now if you phone for assistance with port forwarding there is a very high chance you would be told that they cannot help with this as I have heard other people being told this before I have highlighted we do now assist.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

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    5. #23
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Quote Originally Posted by Hedgehog1979 View Post
      No problem, in all honesty I know a lot of people are not comfortable doing it especially as before it is done the customers have to be advised it would be best to back up the router settings and also that if done incorrectly it can cause issues.

      It was also not briefed out unless it was something I missed so the steps are not obvious unless searched for.

      I used to find it really frustrating speaking to people who wanted help with this but as we did not previously support it I could not assist them.

      The call I had yesterday was actually one I had called back for a colleague as they had never done it so they listened in whilst I talked the customer through what to do.


      Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
      There's also some customers who Think they need port forwarding when they really don't and actually they have another problem that the have but #randomwebpage says ports need to be forwarded

    6. #24
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      New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Indeed, but the most I can do is assist them in what they ask but if it does not help then I will always try to find another answer within the restraints of my job. I am sometimes limited in the advice I can give.


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    7. #25
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Quote Originally Posted by buddbuttocks View Post
      I really wish Sky had looked at a homeplug solution rather than this. Range extenders are invariably poor in my experience.
      I would rather people used cables, they cost 3 ish for 30m long ones and work a damn site better than wifi.

      Homeplugs are the scourge of the earth and should be banned!
      The make so much interference I cannot use a HF receiver or transceiver because neighbours are using them

    8. #26
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Yes Ethernet cables are better. When not in use they don't use any electric either.

      Unfortunately there are many cases where it is not possible for someone to install an Ethernet cable and HomePlugs are therefore a good alternative.

      If your neighbour's HomePlugs are causing interference, have a chat with them. See if they will let you install some Cat 5e cable for them.

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      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

    9. #27
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Quote Originally Posted by dragon2611 View Post
      802.11AC has Tx beam forming as part of the standard which should help with the range, some 802.11N access points can do it but I've always wondered how well that actually works given the client won't be able to do it in the other direction.
      The mechanism by which beamforming is implemented improves the performance of an antenna array in both transmission and reception, so there is an advantage.

    10. #28
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      Quote Originally Posted by James67 View Post
      The mechanism by which beamforming is implemented improves the performance of an antenna array in both transmission and reception, so there is an advantage.
      I have a D-link DIR-654 coming that's supposed to have their version of it so I might see if it makes a difference.... (It was bundled with a NAS unit)

    11. #29
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      I received a booster for free, the only problem is that it brings down the wireless on the SR101 router after 24 hours and I had to perform a hard reset to get it working again. The booster locks you out of the admin functions of the SKY SR101 router. They sent me a second booster after a firmware update of the router but the same problem occurred. I am currently using two netgear WN3000RP repeaters and these work fine.

      Sky have not resolved the issue of incompatible router/booster yet and am not holding my breath whilst they do.

      They have probably given out the boosters in response to bad wireless distances and strength from the SR101.

      The old router with a 12db separate aerial was much better even though it was not wireless N.

    12. #30
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      Re: New Wireless Boosters from Sky

      That booster looks like it has an ethernet jack on it, is it a full fledged repeater (picking up the wifi signal and transmitting it on a different channel) or is it merely a wireless access point? or both? (It cannot retransmit it on the same channel, that's not technically possible).

      I would rather people used cables, they cost 3 ish for 30m long ones and work a damn site better than wifi.
      To be fair, WiFi itself isn't bad. It's only unreliable because it's a small slice of spectrum that everyone is using. WiFi has about 13 channels available to it; of these 13 only three of them do not have subcarriers that overlap, 1, 6, and 11. So just about every router tries to put itself on these three channels. So what happens when you have 20 or 30 transmitters working on the same frequencies? Interference! The other wifi routers operating within the carrier spectrum will see other trasmissions as noise, your wifi cards see these signals as noise since they're not part of the same transmission. They wind up having to compensate for this noise, which results in lower speeds. Having two laptops on opposite ends of a house can cause issues. Both computers, being unable to "see" each others transmissions; might try to broadcast to the wifi router at the same time. Of course, this causes a packet collision and nothing happens.

      The best way to mitigate these issues are to try and find the "emptiest" channel where you are. You guys are more densely packed together than we are over here; and if your 20 closest neighbors have wifi as well; you're likely never going to find a frequency that's empty. 2.4ghz is just entirely too crowded, and when you get multiple routers in the same neighborhood screaming noise in to the spectrum; as well as multiple wifi clients on the same point that can't avoid colliding packets, it's going to be a bad time. The technology was never designed to be used this much in confined areas, especially things like 802.11b, which begin to crawl if you get more than 10 users on the same point. But still, a LOT of the problems come not from the PC being able to see the wifi point; but the wireless card being able to hit the wifi point. It's similar to the cell phone dilemma, the "base station" is putting out plenty of power to be seen, but it's the small transmitter and largely unoptimized antenna in the client device that can't make the return trip. When I was doing internet installs for the cable company (I've worked a multitude of jobs), I actually had a wifi-analyzer I invested in so I could easily scan a persons building and find the the "cleanest" channel. Apartment buildings were always one of the worst places to do WiFi. You weren't allowed to run cables, so you had to use WiFi to do any kind of networking. IF you consider we had about 12 units per floor and the average acccess point would cover the floor below and above, it quickly became impossible to install a wifi point in most places. I could "alternate channels between floors...1 6 and 11 on one floor, 3 and 8 on the next floor (we aren't allowed to use 12 or 13)....and 10 years ago that was fine considering that wifi adoption was somewhat slow over here (ISP's weren't giving it away at that point and you had to buy the equipment yourself). I'm sure if any of you installed a wifi-analyzer on your phone or tablet and ran a scan; you'd probably see every channel being used along with multiple points on the same channel. I live in the middle of nowhere, my wifi spectrum is empty. I have a wireless-n AP running on channel 11 at one end of the house, and a laptop with wireless-n card providing basic wifi access point on the other end using 40mhz channels on channel 1 (which eats up the first seven channels of wifi spectrum). I get wired performace out of my wifi network...if I had a neighbor or two; it would go downhill very quickly and I'd go from getting 110mbps (real-world) over wifi down to something lower. Even I have problems transferring files between two wireless clients in the same room on different wifi channels...they just still interfere with each other. But anywhere else in the house it's a solid as wired.

      5ghz networks are trying to solve this problem; they have much more bandwidth available (depending where you live) and I believe are designed to handle heaver clients and congested traffic better....I haven't studied any of those much as I haven't gotten on to 5ghz and even though it's been around as long as the 2.4ghz range....it's never been wildly adpoted except by geeks in neighborhoods looking to get out of the overcrowded 2.4ghz band.

      802.11AC has Tx beam forming as part of the standard which should help with the range, some 802.11N access points can do it but I've always wondered how well that actually works given the client won't be able to do it in the other direction.
      Beamforming is a set of standards in 802.11AC, it's an optional feature though. They have some kind of funky antennas that obviously aren't omni directional like a dipole and generally use an array of them, turning on ones in the direction of the client. It *can* be used to control signal dispurtion; but it's largely used to "spot-beam" the signal to the client more than wasting RF going out in to space. I know normally in broadcast tower arrays you can control direction by throwing inverted signal through a tower to reduce radiated power in that direction...although it's not an "RF energy saving mechanism" like the beamforming. It'll increase distance and focusing a beam will allow a system to "cut through" the interference. I don't think it's ever going to completely eliminate spectrum crowding; at some point we're going to be filling 802.11ac spectrum up. They are pushing wifi symbol rates up which will in fact speed things up in a multiple client enviroment, as each one gets more data they can receive/transmit during their "window". When the client and base both support beam-forming, then you're focusing all of your RF energy in that direction, which will result in better connection reliability. EVen if the client doesn't. the ability of the router to beam it's signal to it and "listen" in that direction will reduce interference.

      Beamforming on 802.11n radios is not only an option, but there's no direct standard like in 802.11AC, so you have to make sure you buy two devices using the same method..which means using the same manufacturer. While there's no basis for this statement; sometimes finding out what chipset your devices use and using similar brands can yield in better performance. My old 802.11g wifi point had an Atheros chipset and normally performed like any other 802.11g, but connect to it with a laptop that also had an Atheros chip in it's wifi card and you got more than double the speed due to a secret turbo mode only supported by Atheros devices. That's only something you worry about if you're *absolutely* nuts.

      complaining about the connection speed with some HomePlugs because they didn't work well. In some other cases the HomePlugs talked with nextdoor's router. Another issue is to do with the wiring where sometimes the two HomePlugs just haven't communicated in the same home.


      Powerline networking is a real pain because no one realizes the difficulties in pushing a data signal over the power lines. For one thing, you've got this low frequency high voltage signal that causes issues; plus these lines aren't shielded and will pick up transients from devices powering on and off. But your wiring can *really* cause havoc. I don't know what the electrical standards are over there...most of them over here work pretty well because of how houses are required to be wired. The signal will get to down to the electrical panel where it can backfeed through other circuits eventually. The crosstalking I don't have any explanation for unless you and a neighbor are physically sharing the same electrical circuit or are somehow sharing the same transformer connection. This is a problem here in office buildings and some apartements since they have one giant transformer providing the secondary mains for every customer in the building. The only thing preventing the signal from backfeeding in to the rest of the network aside from loss through the cable are the transformers on the poles; data signals generally won't pass through those.

      Homeplugs are the scourge of the earth and should be banned!The make so much interference I cannot use a HF receiver or transceiver because neighbours are using them
      We had something worse happen over here, BPL (Broadband over Power Line). They were using the power grid to transmit broadband data. These are unshielded wide-open lines which basically began radiating signals between 2 and 80mhz. The Japanese in fact had outright banned this technology in the country due to it's HF interference. As an HF enthusiast, I joined the local ham groups in a protest campaign against the FCC to not-license this technology for use as it completely destroyed any usefulness of the HF band. The FCC did not care and licensed the technology. Only after a lawsuit by the ARRL did the FCC say there were problems and made them begin to apply notch filters to remove some of the offending noise. It got the ham bands clear, but the rest of it was completely useless for years. It was only available in a small section; but with an interconnected grid between utilities, people miles outside of the "coverage area" were dealing with the power lines emitting noise as well as some of our older AC devices having all sorts of extra noise.

      The good news is the city decided they couldn't run the network and contracted it to someone else...who failed...and the third company failed; and now the network has been completely shut off.

      I'm not sure what kind of certification the FCC has for the homeplug networking, but they don't seem to care anything about the AM or HF bands anymore as just about *everything* interferes with AM now; compact florescent bulbs, switching power supplies, LED conversion bulbs....It's impossible to listen to an AM radio in the car due to the fact everything you drive by causes interference.

      But the biggest problem with them is they aren't regulated as tightly as they should be.


      One thing I've wondered, is there some clause in your agreement that one couldn't go out and buy their own wifi AP running on a different band and connect it up to the Sky router and maybe disable the wifi function in the router? I've rarely ever relied on provider supplied equipment for anything (except my first basic ADSL bridge/modem and my current fiber router). I mean, if I was in the shoes of most of you, I'd have already ordered some 5ghz wifi gear and used the sky router for it's required routing functions and routing functions alone. I also don't know how "locked down" the SKy router is...whether it gives you limited watered-down control or if you do have some control of all aspects.

      It also helps to resrve IP Addresses
      Only if you want your port forwards to work on a consistent basis. :P

     

     
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