Your forum username:
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up


    Welcome to Sky User - The Unofficial Support Forum for everything Sky! - Proudly helping over 65k members.


    Advertisement

    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
    Results 1 to 10 of 15
    Like Tree8Likes

    UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

    This is a discussion on UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans within the Everyday Life forums, part of the Community channel category; https://news.sky.com/story/uk-bans-m...ceans-11200818 Trillions of microbeads found in face wash products and shower gels end up in the ocean and can be ...

    1. #1
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      27,953
      Thanks
      813
      Thanked 2,197 Times in 2,067 Posts

      UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      https://news.sky.com/story/uk-bans-m...ceans-11200818
      Trillions of microbeads found in face wash products and shower gels end up in the ocean and can be ingested by marine life.

      A UK-wide ban on manufacturers making products containing microbeads has come into force, in an attempt to cut down on plastics in our oceans.

      The beads are used in hundreds of different cosmetic products such as face washes and shower gels.

      It is estimated up to 51 trillion microbeads are currently in our oceans, while a single shower can flush away an estimated 100,000 microbeads.

      They are then ingested by marine life and even end up entering our food chain.

      Environment minister Therese Coffey told Sky News that the ban is part of a wider plan to cut down on plastic pollution.

      She said: "We know that any plastic in the marine environment is not good and we know that animals consume this.

      "They can be ingested directly into the fish and while we're still looking for extra evidence on the impact on human health, the point is that they don't need to be there and that's why we've taken the steps to have this ban."

      The ban has been welcomed by campaigners and cosmetic companies which already use natural alternatives to microbeads.

      Tipper Lewis, from organic skincare company Neal's Yard, said: "We think the ban is absolutely fantastic.

      "We use all sorts of things instead of plastic; rosehip seed powder which we can use for facial products, we've got pumice powder which we use in body products, it's a bit more exfoliating… and we've got ground rice powder which we use in our facial scrubs as well.

      "The benefits of these is they're all biodegradable so they break down in the oceans, they don't get into the food chains and we don't end up eating them."

      Mary Creagh, who chairs the Environment Audit Committee, said the ban was a "good thing" but the Government must go "much further, much faster".

      The MP said: "We need to look at how plastic has invaded every area of our life.

      "Since the ban recommendation, my committee has also recommended that we should have a deposit return scheme, the latte levy because of the recyclability of coffee cups and we've also recommended that producers who make hard to recycle products are forced to pay more for them."

      Although manufacturing microbead products has been banned, they will not be removed from shop shelves completely until July.
      Comment: It is important to be aware that these microbeads are getting into our sealife, along with many other plastics. If you watched the hugely popular Blue Planet II series in BBC 1 you will have been shown much of the damage already being identified. So please, this is just a small step in the right direction.

      What products does this affect?

      Actually quite a lot. Some I thought would be safe, aren't. So I will need to make some suitable changes to what I buy in future too. How do I know this? Well, I happened to come across an article that provides this information. In the article is a link to the page linked below. This provides a detailed list of products that you can buy today with Microbeads. It also lists some products with other plastics. Can I please encourage everyone to start buying alternative products?

      Thank you,
      Scubbie

      Product Lists | Beat the Microbead


    2. Advertisement
    3. #2
      pete.i's Avatar
      pete.i is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 01757
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sagem F@ST 2504
      Sky TV: Freesat/etc
      Join Date
      Jun 2007
      Posts
      303
      Thanks
      2
      Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Do products such as Swafega, you know the stuff for cleaning oily hands, come under "beauty products." Swafega contains micro beads as do a lot of the other products for cleaning gunky hands. The namby pamby smooth cleaners just do not work. Without the micro beads my hands would be continually oily black. I look after oily, old, vintage-ish boat engines.
      lettice likes this.

    4. #3
      lettice's Avatar
      lettice is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 0.4 mile away
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: ER110UK Sky Q hub
      Sky TV: SkyQ2tb + minis
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Location
      England
      Posts
      1,896
      Thanks
      12
      Thanked 162 Times in 154 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Quote Originally Posted by pete.i View Post
      Do products such as Swafega, you know the stuff for cleaning oily hands, come under "beauty products." Swafega contains micro beads as do a lot of the other products for cleaning gunky hands. The namby pamby smooth cleaners just do not work. Without the micro beads my hands would be continually oily black. I look after oily, old, vintage-ish boat engines.
      Not giving mine up.
      But then all mine are in tins, not plastic bottles.

    5. #4
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      27,953
      Thanks
      813
      Thanked 2,197 Times in 2,067 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Swafega does appear in the red list. It's listed under 'Diverse'.

      Hopefully, Deb Group Ltd is on the case and are in the final stages of developing an alternative product. If not, I guess that latex gloves won't be sufficient, so you'll probably need to look at some tough gardening gloves with a method to stop the oil and grease from seeping through.

      Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro: Connected at 80,000 kbps / 20,000 kbps
      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

    6. #5
      lettice's Avatar
      lettice is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 0.4 mile away
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: ER110UK Sky Q hub
      Sky TV: SkyQ2tb + minis
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Location
      England
      Posts
      1,896
      Thanks
      12
      Thanked 162 Times in 154 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Quote Originally Posted by Scubbie View Post
      Swafega does appear in the red list. It's listed under 'Diverse'.

      Hopefully, Deb Group Ltd is on the case and are in the final stages of developing an alternative product. If not, I guess that latex gloves won't be sufficient, so you'll probably need to look at some tough gardening gloves with a method to stop the oil and grease from seeping through.
      That looks like a girly version called Swarfega orange, it said it has a pleasant fragrance. That is not Swarfega as I know it.
      Notice they even do Swarfega wipes now too.
      Had my tins for years and have enough in the shed that will outlast me probably, so hope I can be safe in saying by then that tin will still be safe to dispose of.
      Or I could put it in my will to hand down the tins to the family I think

    7. #6
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      27,953
      Thanks
      813
      Thanked 2,197 Times in 2,067 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Is the version you are using still available in the shops? If not, then this will explain why it isn't listed.

      As for leaving the tins to your children, that's fine.

      What I would ask is you consider what you are actually leaving them.



      When the 5p tax on plastic bags was introduced I too was upset. For a long time, I have been using them after I've been shopping. I use them to line my waste bins at home. Once a week I took out the bag, with the rubbish and put them into a larger black plastic bag, which then goes into the wheelie bin to be emptied once a fortnight.

      When I've worked abroad I've seen plastic bags flying everywhere in the wind. The local work going around with his broken bag, picking up the rubbish in the street, only for it to fall out underneath as there was a large hole in the bottom. Holidaymakers would complain to me about it. I was in no position to raise it with the people who mattered and I didn't even know who they would be.

      As a diver, I have witnessed the changing conditions in our seas first hand. I haven't been diving that long compared to others, but long enough to see the damage. Reefs that were once full of life, now nothing more than rubble covered in algae and no fish swimming around the Ergs, hiding under the Staghorn coral or in the anemone.

      On one dive I had been given a brief that described a fantastic site. Lots of soft corals and hard corals, nautilus, groupers, anemones, fusiliers, and much more. Unbeknown to me, a couple of the group had dived it 3 years before. It was as described. When we descended I quickly realised that I was going to struggle with this one. The site was completely dead. I saw one nautilus shell. Nothing inside it. Algae everywhere. The site was remote and it hadn't been trashed by day-trippers out for a snorkel.

      We need to act and act now.

      When I was guiding I would ensure that those in my charge behaved well and refrained from touching the reef or chasing the fish. As a diving Instructor, I try to pass this on to my students.

      Some of the things that I have purchased are on the lists. I wasn't aware, but they are. I need to make some changes to what I use too. I would hope that others here will also look at the list and start making changes today.

      Thank you.

      Isitme and lettice like this.

      Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro: Connected at 80,000 kbps / 20,000 kbps
      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

    8. #7
      lettice's Avatar
      lettice is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 0.4 mile away
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: ER110UK Sky Q hub
      Sky TV: SkyQ2tb + minis
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Location
      England
      Posts
      1,896
      Thanks
      12
      Thanked 162 Times in 154 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      I thought Id be a good boy.
      I've checked everything we regularly buy and we are good, none in the Red or Orange, some in the Green list.
      Those though would be ok containers for putting into our recycle bin anyway and would hope that they are sorted correctly there.

      Seeing all these Beeb and Sky films, do wonder if anyone is actually cleaning up the plastic on the sea bed.
      Was down the beach last week a few times on my walks at Stokes Bay and Lee on Solent, the high winds and tides had certainly bought in small amounts of all kinds onto the shore.
      That has been happening for decades. But maybe that's a good thing they get washed up, as they do have regular shore cleanups by locals.
      Mostly those beaches stay pretty clean most times, except during the summer months hottest busy days when families leave their rubbish on the beach from their picnics.
      Scubbie likes this.

    9. #8
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      27,953
      Thanks
      813
      Thanked 2,197 Times in 2,067 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      There is a surprising amount of rubbish floating in our seas. Most of the time it is hidden, even from water users. Whether it's a by-product of landfill being washed into the sea, ships dumping illegally or fishing boats losing some of the gear, it's there.

      Locally the biggest issue we have is dredging. Sure the mud in the Solent has helped to preserve wrecks such as The Mary Rose and HMS Invincible (1742). The ooze is well known about locally. It is a problem though.

      In 2016 a specific site I dived was being studied and recorded. At the beginning of the season, a team cleared the mud off the site, exposing some old timbers. This was on purpose. The site remained reasonably clear for the whole season whilst the project was completed. I dived it a few times myself.

      I dived the same site in 2017. It was deep in mud. The mud which was being dumped on the dumping grounds near Nab Tower.

      Sure they needed to clear out Portsmouth Harbour to allow the new carriers to arrive. Southampton also had to dig out their port to make it deeper for the new huge cargo ships. There is also continuing work to keep all the local harbours and sea lanes clear, clear enough for shipping to come in, but why dump it there? The dumping grounds are actually very close to where aggregates are being dredged from for building, so all that mud is just being recycled through the water column time again.

      The answer is "because that's where we've always dumped it".

      Well, I for one saw just was damaged it is doing. Not just in the water column, but also where it eventually lies on the bottom.

      On a specific site I know of is a protected wreck. A study was done a few years ago in the mud surrounding it. A lot of life was found in the mud. More than usual because there is a ban on any form of fishing near this specific wreck. All that life has been smothered. Several inches of mud now lie on top of where the life once lived. Please don't ask me specifically how deep the mud is as I'm not digging into it. It is a protected site anyway.

      Last year I saw that there are plans to reintroduce oysters into the local area. They have a great idea that the oysters will help to clean up the water. Improve the water quality. If those oysters are left on the seabed, they'll have no chance.

      A protected marine reserve off the North West coast of the Isle of Wight also had a problem last year. One specific dredger dumped it's load too close. I didn't hear about that in the local news but saw the tracking on MarineTraffic.com after someone else reported it.

      So where could all the mud be dumped? A better place would be the middle of the channel. However, I am aware of a lot of WW2 subs and other shipwrecks in that area too. Whilst they are dived less frequently, they are dived. They are around 60-70m deep. Dumping all this mud would make those serious dives, far more treachorous.

      A few years ago the dumping grounds in the Plymouth area had to change. The change was prompted following the deaths of a couple of divers on a wreck which had been sunk for divers.

      I apologise if I seem to be going off on one over this. I wouldn't class myself as an Eco-warrior or anything like that. However, there is a lot of damage happening off our own shores at this time. All of us are no more than 56 miles from the sea. Whether or not we use it, our lives are affected by what goes on in it.

      Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro: Connected at 80,000 kbps / 20,000 kbps
      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

    10. #9
      seawright's Avatar
      seawright is online now Sky User Member
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Other ISP
      Router: Non Sky Router
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Jul 2012
      Posts
      3,208
      Thanks
      63
      Thanked 337 Times in 328 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      We should all aspire to prevent plastic waste from contaminating our environment but the stable door has already been open for decades so a major clean up is also required. This may well be impossible as much of the waste is already integrated into living organisms making it difficult to separate the baby from the bath water.

      It would be easy to be overwhelmed by the enormity of the task but something must be done. It may be only a drop in the ocean but as this BBC news article shows at least a start has been made.
      Floating bin sucking up Portsmouth Harbour's rubbish - BBC News
      Scubbie and lettice like this.

    11. #10
      lettice's Avatar
      lettice is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: 0.4 mile away
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: ER110UK Sky Q hub
      Sky TV: SkyQ2tb + minis
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Location
      England
      Posts
      1,896
      Thanks
      12
      Thanked 162 Times in 154 Posts

      Re: UK bans microbeads in beauty products in bid to cut plastic in oceans

      Quote Originally Posted by seawright View Post
      It would be easy to be overwhelmed by the enormity of the task but something must be done. It may be only a drop in the ocean but as this BBC news article shows at least a start has been made.
      Floating bin sucking up Portsmouth Harbour's rubbish - BBC News
      If that works, then just make loads of them but bigger. a little bell and light and sat tracker on top and bingo.
      But, I do wonder what then happens to the waste in there, where does it go, who will be distributing it and sorting it. That is when these ideas seem good but then get put on the shelf as it all becomes too expensive or someone else's problem on any kind of real scale to make a difference.
      Its the thing with all this, its just little efforts here and there and with the reports this morning talking about some baseline targets planned for 2042, make me think it'll be so slow progress.

      I know Sky tried hard with the Sky sea whale rescue thing, but too much same old coverage of it over the last few months has made me switch off everytime its on screen now. Looks like the Beeb have jumped on the bandwagon now form that article (do not watch or use Beeb News much these days).

     

     
    Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    SkyUser - Copyright © 2006-2017. SatDish and NewsreadeR | SkyUser is in no way affiliated with Sky Broadband / BSkyB
    RIPA NOTICE: NO CONSENT IS GIVEN FOR INTERCEPTION OF PAGE TRANSMISSION