Your forum username:
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up


    Welcome to Sky User - The Unofficial Support Forum for everything Sky! - Proudly helping over 65k members.


    Advertisement

    Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
    Results 1 to 10 of 40
    Like Tree10Likes

    The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

    This is a discussion on The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut within the Everyday Life forums, part of the Community channel category; The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut | Home News ...

    1. #1
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      28,079
      Thanks
      828
      Thanked 2,207 Times in 2,076 Posts

      The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut | Home News | News | The Independent
      In an impassioned appeal, Dr Nick Foreman remembers the near-fatal accident that convinced him of the need to stop motorists driving at 30mph in built-up areas

      This is what happens and this is how it feels. I was driving along a well-lit suburban street with my two small stepchildren in the back of the car. We were on the way to pick up my wife who had been working away for a few days, and we were all excited about seeing her. It was 6.35pm on a dark February evening and I had some rather gloomy Radiohead music on the CD player.

      In an instant, a few yards in front of me was a small child. He was followed by an adult. I remember thinking "WHAT THE..." and then reflexively hit my brakes. The car skidded and I ran into both of them. The child flew through the air, caught in the beam of my headlights. I didn't see the adult.

      Traffic stopped behind me and on the other side of the road ahead of me. For a few seconds everything was still. The child, who looked about three years old, was crying in a heap a few yards in front of my car; the adult had been thrown further.

      I stopped thinking normally. I had no idea what to do. It was probably only 30 seconds after the accident and already a crowd was appearing. I realised that I needed to phone the emergency services and I went back to my car and got my phone. I couldn't bring myself to address my children in the back seat.

      Ringing 999 seemed to takes ages. There was a dislocation between the absolute panic now enveloping me and the calm voice on the other end. I grabbed a bystander to ask where we were. By this point, a large number of people had gathered.

      My victims were clearly local with lots of family and friends in the vicinity. They surrounded the bodies lying on the road and after a few false starts at trying to be a doctor, I gave up. I felt incompetent and could only think that I had done this.

      It started to become clearer what had happened. The child had got out of a car in a side street and had run towards the main road; his aunt had screamed and run after him. Both had run into my path.

      Somebody tapped me on the shoulder. "Are you all right, mate? I saw everything. The kid ran out in front of you there was nothing you could have done." These were very kind words. I remembered my children. I put my head back into the car both were crying. I said everything was going to be fine, but I had no idea whether this was the truth.

      On the road, nothing had changed. I rang my wife, incoherent. "Something awful has happened..." She was calm. She established where I was and said she'd be there shortly in a taxi. The traffic was backed up on either side of the car. It must have been about seven or eight minutes after the accident when an off-duty paramedic appeared and took control.

      After a further five minutes or so the police arrived lots of them. I was identified as the driver and was told to switch off my engine and sit in my car. Then a rapid-response team arrived in an ambulance car and another five minutes after that, thank God, an ambulance. I heard them apologise for being so long.

      The policemen were very young. They were polite but firm and they started to appeal for witnesses, whom they began to interview as the ambulance men got out stretchers to carefully move the bodies.

      A man tapped on my car window. I got out. He said he was the child's father. He asked me how I was and said he thought his son was going to be OK. A paramedic then came over. He told me not to be frightened about the stretchers, he didn't think there had been any major injuries.

      The ambulance then sped off and a police sergeant appeared. He was less friendly and spent a long time inspecting my car. He ordered the young policemen to chalk the road, to show the position of my car.

      My wife appeared, walking along the road with her luggage. The sergeant then allowed the car to be moved and one of the young policemen said he would take me home later. My wife drove the children home.

      The police then explained that I would need to accompany them to the police station. They asked me if I had been intimidated by the crowd I hadn't. The police were now friendly and sympathetic. The witnesses corroborated my story.

      The ride in the police car was short and the police station was cold. I couldn't stop shaking. The Breathalyser test was carefully explained and I passed it. I was led through my witness statement by one policeman as another checked my car insurance and tax on their databases.

      I was then told that no action would be taken against me and I was taken home by one of the young policemen. He told me to ring him if I needed to talk. He rang me a day or two later and told me that the aunt and the child had no broken bones and were both at home nursing some bruising.

      The aunt wanted to talk to me and he asked whether he could give her my phone number. She rang me a few minutes later to tell me that she and her nephew were both well and to thank me for not driving fast. I told her that it was brave of her to try to save the child, and she laughed.

      So what has this experience done to me? Suddenly, a few speeding points on my licence don't seem quite so innocent. If you have any, you should also feel ashamed. It is easy to exceed the speed limit and, thankfully, on this occasion, I wasn't. Nor was I fiddling with my mobile phone, sat-nav, or CD player, all of which I have done before.

      I think I was going at 20mph at the point of impact, and maybe now you will agree with me that that should be the speed limit in built-up areas.

      Dr Nick Foreman is a GP from Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire. This article is published in this week's British Medical Journal
      Comment: Portsmouth was one of the early adopters of having 20mph speed limits on all their side street. Do you think this is the right thing to do?

    2. The Following User Says Thank You to Scubbie For This Useful Post:

      siege2 (15-01-16)


    3. Advertisement
    4. #2
      siege2's Avatar
      siege2 is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: FenceHouses
      Broadband ISP: Sky Broadband Unlimited
      Router: Sagem F@ST 2304n
      Sky TV: Other
      Join Date
      Feb 2011
      Location
      DH4 Area North East
      Posts
      45
      Thanks
      7
      Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      thanks for the post scubbie.

    5. #3
      FelixTCat's Avatar
      FelixTCat is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Tilehurst
      Broadband ISP: BT Infinity 2
      Router: Non Sky Router
      Sky TV: Other
      Join Date
      Aug 2008
      Location
      Reading
      Posts
      868
      Thanks
      10
      Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      The real lesson of this is that parents should control their children on or near roads, not that speed limits should be 20 mph. The speed limit is irrelevant. If the child had been knocked over by the man walking in front of the car with a red flag and hit its head on the kerb it could still have been seriously injured.

      This is typical of the emotional appeal of those who want to impose their own ideas on others, irrespective of the underlying facts. It is not politically correct these days to tell parents to control their little darlings - they must be allowed to do whatever they like and others are responsible for the consequences, not the parents.
      dog-man likes this.
      Wireless

    6. The Following User Says Thank You to FelixTCat For This Useful Post:

      dog-man (15-01-16)

    7. #4
      dave richardson's Avatar
      dave richardson is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Plymouth
      Broadband ISP: Connect
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky Q 2TB
      Join Date
      Jun 2007
      Location
      Plymstock
      Posts
      76
      Thanks
      4
      Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      Wow! Certainty makes you think.

      Thanks Scubbie

    8. #5
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      28,079
      Thanks
      828
      Thanked 2,207 Times in 2,076 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      Whilst I do agree that any adult who is looking after a child on or near a road should look after them, things happen.

      In the case of the story above it happens to be a 3 year old child who was running away from the auntie. I'm sure that we can think of children in other age groups who may do something just as silly.

      Blaming the child when you too could have helped to prevent it going wrong is not a good answer IMHO. Just as it takes two to have an argument, it takes two to hit someone.

      Of course if Dr Nick had been travelling at say 40mph, that child wouldn't have been nursing the bruises.


      Hopefully this story will help people to think.

      Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro: Connected at 80,000 kbps / 20,000 kbps
      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

    9. #6
      dave richardson's Avatar
      dave richardson is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Plymouth
      Broadband ISP: Connect
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky Q 2TB
      Join Date
      Jun 2007
      Location
      Plymstock
      Posts
      76
      Thanks
      4
      Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      I've just posted this thought provoking story on the MBclub website
      Scubbie likes this.

    10. #7
      FelixTCat's Avatar
      FelixTCat is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Tilehurst
      Broadband ISP: BT Infinity 2
      Router: Non Sky Router
      Sky TV: Other
      Join Date
      Aug 2008
      Location
      Reading
      Posts
      868
      Thanks
      10
      Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      Blaming the child when you too could have helped to prevent it going wrong is not a good answer IMHO
      I don't think that anyone has blamed the child; it was only 3 years old! In this case the aunt is the one at fault. The child should have been secured in the car and only released when the adult could control it. Clearly this did not happen, the child ran free and was very lucky not to have been seriously injured.

      The only one I feel sorry for here is the driver. It isn't clear whether visibility of the side street was reduced by rows of parked cars; if that was the case, the driver should have foreseen that something could come out of the side street, even if just the nose of a car 'til its driver could see clearly, and slowed down accordingly.

      Unfortunately, this story doesn't have the ring of truth.

      A man tapped on my car window. I got out. He said he was the child's father. He asked me how I was and said he thought his son was going to be OK
      How likely is it that a father whose 3-year-old is lying in a crumpled heap in the road, surrounded by police and medics, is going to do this? Rant and rave, yes. Show sympathy to the driver? Really? The man is a saint.

      I think I was going at 20mph at the point of impact, and maybe now you will agree with me that that should be the speed limit in built-up areas.
      No, I don't.

    11. #8
      dog-man's Avatar
      dog-man is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: About 130 mtrs from the cabinet.
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro
      Router: Asus 3200
      Sky TV: Freesat
      Join Date
      Aug 2007
      Location
      Planet Earth
      Posts
      1,640
      Thanks
      88
      Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      If I was the father, I would not automatically blame the driver. I would want to know the facts first before applying blame on anyone.

      From the above, it does seem that the Aunt was at fault.

      I do not agree with 20 mph zones except for around schools and play areas.

    12. #9
      FelixTCat's Avatar
      FelixTCat is offline Sky User Member
      Exchange: Tilehurst
      Broadband ISP: BT Infinity 2
      Router: Non Sky Router
      Sky TV: Other
      Join Date
      Aug 2008
      Location
      Reading
      Posts
      868
      Thanks
      10
      Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      I do not agree with 20 mph zones except for around schools and play areas.
      I certainly agree about schools, but permanent speed limits even there are silly. Children are only present for 4 hours per day (outside the school) maximum, for 5 days per week and 40 weeks of the year. The rest of the time there is no need for a 20 mph limit.

      In the USA, school zones have yellow lights which flash at the relevant times, with a posted speed limit of 20, 15 or even 10 mph when the lights are flashing, but no special limit otherwise. The limit is VERY strictly enforced, with heavy fines for exceeding it. There is usually a police car present at those times. No doubt a similar arrangement could be set up here, using speed cameras if necessary.

    13. #10
      Scubbie's Avatar
      Scubbie is offline Sky User Moderator
      Exchange: 02392
      Broadband ISP: Sky Fibre Unlimited
      Router: Sky Q Hub ER110
      Sky TV: Sky+HD box
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Near Portsmouth
      Posts
      28,079
      Thanks
      828
      Thanked 2,207 Times in 2,076 Posts

      Re: The day I hit a child at 20mph - and realised the speed limit must be cut

      Setting up a speed camera in the side roads is wrought with problems.

      It's the locals who will normally be using it and they'll all know where that camera is. This will mean that they'll slow down there and not the rest of the road.

      Of course with all the parked cars on either side of the road, there is unlikely to be a clear view of the road anyway.

      As for what the roads can look like in Portsmouth, where there is already a 20mph limit, here's an image I've found on the Internet...



      Unusually there's a gap for two cars behind the red one on the right. This road is also a little wider than some of them.

      For those who are unfamiliar with this road, here's a link. The page has a small square showing the OS Landranger map of the area.

      On this one road there are three cross roads (the picture is taken at one of them, the other two are visible) and two T-Junctions (one is behind the camera).

      Anyone of those terrace houses can have children under the age of 5. Any one of them could have a brother or sister who could open the front door. Any one of those children under the age of 5 could easily run out...

      Of course any 10 or 12 year old could kick a ball out from the footpath and decide to chase after it... Opps!

      Things sometimes just happen. As an adult we know what should and what should not happen. Sometimes we need to anticipate what could happen.

      This may be starting to look like a defensive driving course. It's how you need to drive in areas like this IMHO.

      Recently I've been watching various videos on both YouTube and Facebook that were made by people using a dash cam or head cam. Some of what I've seen is frightening. I'll apologise in advance for some of the language on the video below. If you don't like bad language, please don't click it. If you're screamish or have an aversion to frightening scenes (no blood & gore in this video) then don't watch it.


      Sky Fibre Unlimited Pro: Connected at 80,000 kbps / 20,000 kbps
      Previous ADSL2+ Speed 19999 kbps 1153 kbps, Line Attenuation 17.5 db 6.9 db, Noise Margin 7.5 dB 8.7 dB
      Speedtest: 17.15MB/s 0.97Mb/s Ping 31 ms

     

     
    Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

    Tags for this Thread

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    SkyUser - Copyright © 2006-2017. SatDish and NewsreadeR | SkyUser is in no way affiliated with Sky Broadband / BSkyB
    RIPA NOTICE: NO CONSENT IS GIVEN FOR INTERCEPTION OF PAGE TRANSMISSION