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    JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

    This is a discussion on JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee within the Everyday Life forums, part of the Community channel category; JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee - BBC News JPeg pictures could soon have built-in restrictions making them harder ...

    1. #1
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      JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee - BBC News
      JPeg pictures could soon have built-in restrictions making them harder to copy, if recommendations by the body overseeing the format are implemented.

      The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPeg) committee has called for controls over how image data in .jpg files is accessed.

      It is thought this would protect copyright and safeguard the privacy of people in images.

      However, rights groups have said the features might harm creativity.

      In an online summary of the proposals, the JPeg committee said photographs were often redistributed without relevant rights information attached, so they could easily be copied or published again without permission.

      Privacy concerns


      And in some cases, the privacy of the photographer could be compromised if metadata embedded in the images, which could include the geo-location of wherever the photo was taken, was accessible.

      "Currently, these concerns are not well addressed and [are] an inhibiting factor in the further proliferation of digital content distribution," the JPeg committee briefing said.

      The JPeg committee has no concrete plans to change the JPeg format yet, but hopes to seek technological solutions once the specifics of the new proposals have been decided, according to convener of the committee Touradj Ebrahimi.

      Speaking to the BBC, Dr Ebrahimi said whatever changes might be made, JPeg files would still be freely shareable if their authors wanted them to be.

      "One thing that's important to note is that this is not something we're imposing," he said.

      "We are just saying, 'Let people have a choice.' Those who are perfectly happy with today's situation and want to have security-free image sharing [will still be able to]."

      Currently, when someone wants to protect an image from being viewed by certain people, it is possible to publish it on websites with their own privacy protecting software, such as Facebook.

      However, if the photograph is taken from that site by someone who has access to it and sent elsewhere, it could then be distributed to anyone.

      Built-in controls


      Dr Ebrahimi suggested that it might be better to have access controls actually built in to the file.

      "It would be best if you have one image that is protected in such a way that if you have the rights, you see it clear; if you don't have the rights, you don't see it," he said.

      The idea has caused some concern among rights groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF).

      In a blog
      , the EFF warned against putting tight restrictions on JPeg files and suggested the move could stifle creativity - hampering an artist from using a photograph in a new work, for example.

      It might also be difficult to secure the restrictions from those who wanted to crack them, said Jim Killock, executive director of the Open Rights Group.

      He compared the situation to digital rights management (DRM) software, which is found on products such as DVDs and prevents copying of the content.
      "DRM tends to be easily broken," he told the BBC. "People who want to break the rules would still do that."

      Mr Killock also expressed concerns that companies might charge steep fees for allowing certain levels of access to restricted images.

      "You're going to want to edit pictures, crop them, alter them, all of these sorts of things that DRM potentially restricts, so I guess the other major beneficiary would end up being software publishers," he said.

      The JPeg format is the most widely used image format on the internet, and according to the JPeg committee, several billion JPeg images are produced every day.


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    3. #2
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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      I'm getting a feeling of déjà vu. The reasoning might be slightly different but didn't this happen twenty years ago with the GIF image format leading to the creation of PNGs? If so then it's a nail in the coffin for JPEGs as the same outcome should still be appropriate.

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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      As the article states, it would not be too difficult to strip the protective information out of any such image file, so to me it's a pointless exercise.

      Whilst I do wish to retain the copyright of any photos that I took which I have posted say on this forum, I don't wish to have the geographical location of where the photo was taken, especially when it may have been taken at home, and my full name embedded in the metadata too.

      There are many reasons why people post images on websites and a lot of reasons why some people will wish to copy those images. Because of a variety of changes over the years, there are just as many different formats available too.

      Today I've been going through some of the photos I took whilst on holiday. Each photo on my main camera has a corresponding RAW and jpg file. With the HDR processing I'm creating a single .tif file from the 1, 4 or 5 images used. I will then edit it and save the final result as a .png, jpg and .tif.

      Why so many? Simply because some formats record more information than others. This has a kick back meaning that when you post them on the Internet they might be too big. The .png is great for the video work. jpg is great for the forums and .tif if I want to edit it further.

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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      Yes metadata can be a problem. I believe that at one time, not too long ago, Microsoft document (.doc) files contained the MAC address of the computer they were created on. It's not just metadata either. I was once sent a redacted report which contained all the original text, though of course it wasn't normally displayed.

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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      I tried to download what was apparently an innocent jpeg photo to my ps3 once, only to find it was 'wrapped up' inside a .axd file which ps3's can't read.

      (It went to my usb stick* & is still there whatever it is lol).

      * Surely when 128GB drives have become half the size of your thumbnail 'stick' isn't really the right word anymore?

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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      Quote Originally Posted by gymno View Post
      It went to my usb stick* ...

      * Surely when 128GB drives have become half the size of your thumbnail 'stick' isn't really the right word anymore?

      I was thinking usb trunk but apparently the name is already being used for a charging cable.

      edit: I'm guessing, as in elephant not tree.
      gymno likes this.

    8. #7
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      Re: JPeg lockdown: Restriction options sought by committee

      Even usb twig wouldn't be right.

     

     

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